Normal processing time
1 month

Quick job start normally takes
0-10 days

Processing fee
DKK 4,405,-

If you are applying for a residence and work permit after the Fast track scheme, it is your employer who must handle the application process using a power of attorney from you.

However, it is important that you are aware of the scheme's conditions and the options you have with the scheme. Read more about this below.

 

What is Fast track?

The Fast-track scheme makes it faster and more flexible for certified companies to recruit foreign employees to work in Denmark.

In addition, the scheme allows you to alternate between working in Denmark and working abroad.

Your employment must meet the conditions for one of the Fast track scheme’s four tracks

  • The pay limit track
  • The short-term track
  • The researcher track
  • The educational track

What are the conditions for the pay limit track?

You can choose the pay limit track if you have an annual salary of at least DKK 448,000. This corresponds to the pay limit amount of the Pay Limit scheme. 

Salary must be paid to a Danish bank account.

It is not required that the transfer to the Danish bank account must happen from a Danish bank account.

It is a condition that you have been offered a job with an annual salary that corresponds to at least the pay limit amount. The pay limit amount for 2022 is DKK 448,000. The pay limit amount is regulated every year on 1 January.

When SIRI has to assess whether you have been offered a salary that corresponds to at least the pay limit amount, only the following salary components can be taken into account:

  • Cash salary, including fixed supplements which therefore are guaranteed salary
  • Payments to labour market pension schemes, including pension contributions paid by the employer and contributions paid by the applicant
  • Paid holiday allowance 

You must meet the condition of an annual salary that corresponds to at least the pay limit amount even if you take holiday without pay.

If you earn holiday allowance that can only be paid to you the following year, this amount cannot count towards the annual salary for the year in which you have earned it. Moreover, it is only holiday allowance paid by the specific employer that you right now are allowed to work for, that can be counted as part of your salary.

Your employer can offer you, as a supplement to your salary, benefits such as paid canteen, free use of car, paid phone, paid internet and paid living and housing expenses. Note that these salary components cannot be taken into account when assessing whether your salary corresponds to the pay limit amount.

Your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account in a bank operating legally in Denmark.

It is not a requirement that the salary paid into the Danish bank account is transferred from a Danish bank account.

Likewise, there are no limitations to the type of bank account that can be used: for example, a currency account and a basic bank account can both be used.

The Danish bank account must be opened no later than 90 days after the date on which you have been granted a Danish residence and work permit. If you enter Denmark after having been granted a permit, the Danish bank account must be opened within 90 days from entry. If you already hold a permit which is valid for at least 3 months, your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account from the first salary payment.

The salary that you have been offered must not be less than the standard within the professional field in which you are going to work.

When assessing whether the salary you have been offered corresponds to Danish standards, only the following salary components can be taken into account:

  • Cash salary, including fixed supplements which therefore are guaranteed salary
  • Payments to labour market pension schemes, including pension contributions paid by the employer and contributions paid by the applicant
  • Paid holiday allowance 

If you earn holiday allowance, which can only be paid to you the following year, this cannot count towards the annual salary for the year in which you have earned it. Moreover, it is only holiday allowance paid by the specific employer that you are right now allowed to work for, that can be counted as part of your salary.

Your employer might offer you, as a supplement to your salary, benefits such as paid canteen, free use of car, paid phone, paid internet and paid living and housing expenses. Note that these salary components cannot be taken into account when assessing whether your salary corresponds to Danish standards.

Read more about Danish standards for salary

Your terms of employment, such as your holiday entitlements, terms of notice, etc. must not be inferior to the standards within the professional field in which you are going to work.

If SIRI has any doubts on whether your terms of employment correspond to Danish standards, we can ask the regional labour market councils to assess your terms of employment.

Read more about Danish standards for terms of employment

It is a condition that you work full time. As a rule, this mean 37-40 working hours a week.

The condition that your salary corresponds to a least the pay limit amount must be met regardless of the number of work hours.

A residence and work permit cannot be granted for a job that is covered by a legal labour dispute.

A permit can be given for other jobs in a company affected by a dispute, if these jobs are not covered by the conflict according to the rules of labour law.

In some instances, it is required that you have a Danish authorisation or a temporary authorisation for employment for adaption and training purposes before you can be granted a residence and work permit.

If you have taken up employment for adaption and training purposes in order to obtain a Danish authorisation, you need to have a temporary authorisation (evalueringsautorisation) issued by the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

If you have been offered employment as a medical doctor, you need to obtain an authorisation from the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

Read more about authorisation here

It is a condition that your spouse, cohabiting partner, child or any other family member, who holds a residence permit as an accompanying family member, must not have had his or her residence permit revoked more than once due to the lack of a required specific work permit.

What are the conditions for the short-term track?

If you are to stay and work for a short period of time at a certified company, the short-term track can be relevant for you.

With a short-term stay you can be granted a residence and work permit for up to 90 days.

The 90 days can be divided into several stays.

Each stay must be applied for individually and the combined period must not exceed 90 days from entering Denmark the first time.

If you are granted a provisional work permit, the 3 months period will be counted from the date of the provisionary permit.

Residence in Denmark on another basis than the short-term track is not taken into account when calculating the period of a maximum of 90 days that is possible under the short-term track.

The 90 days can be divided into several stays.

You must apply for a permit for each stay and the combined period must not exceed 90 days from the day of entering Denmark for the first time.

If you are granted a provisional work permit, the 3 months period will be counted from the date of the provisionary permit.

Residence in Denmark on another basis than the short-term track is not taken into account when calculating the period of a maximum of 90 days that is possible under the short-term track.

When applying for short-term stay number two (or more) within the same year, you must attach documentation for previous short-term stays in Denmark.

If you, during a previous short-term stay, stayed for a shorter period than your permit allowed, it is possible to only factor in the actual length of stay in Denmark. In that case you must attach documentation for entry and exit related to your previous stay.

This can be documented by providing the following documentation:

  • Stamps in your passport
  • Boarding pass or other travel documentation
  • Information or data from your company’s HR department 

A residence- and work permit under the short-term track cannot be extended.

The so called job change rule does not apply between two short-term stays at the same employer.

Read more about the job change rule here

The salary that you have been offered must not be less than the standard within the professional field in which you are going to work.

When assessing whether the salary you have been offered corresponds to Danish standards, only the following salary components can be taken into account:

  • Cash salary, including fixed supplements which therefore are guaranteed salary
  • Payments to labour market pension schemes, including pension contributions paid by the employer and contributions paid by the applicant
  • Paid holiday allowance 

If you earn holiday allowance, which can only be paid to you the following year, this cannot count towards the annual salary for the year in which you have earned it. Moreover, it is only holiday allowance paid by the specific employer that you are right now allowed to work for, that can be counted as part of your salary.

Your employer might offer you, as a supplement to your salary, benefits such as paid canteen, free use of car, paid phone, paid internet and paid living and housing expenses. Note that these salary components cannot be taken into account when assessing whether your salary corresponds to Danish standards.

Read more about Danish standards for salary

Your terms of employment, such as your holiday entitlements, terms of notice, etc. must not be inferior to the standards within the professional field in which you are going to work.

If SIRI has any doubts on whether your terms of employment correspond to Danish standards, we can ask the regional labour market councils to assess your terms of employment.

Read more about Danish standards for terms of employment

It is a condition that you work full time. As a rule, this mean 37-40 working hours a week.

A residence and work permit cannot be granted for a job that is covered by a legal labour dispute.

A permit can be given for other jobs in a company affected by a dispute, if these jobs are not covered by the conflict according to the rules of labour law.

In some instances, it is required that you have a Danish authorisation or a temporary authorisation for employment for adaption and training purposes before you can be granted a residence and work permit.

If you have taken up employment for adaption and training purposes in order to obtain a Danish authorisation, you need to have a temporary authorisation (evalueringsautorisation) issued by the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

If you have been offered employment as a medical doctor, you need to obtain an authorisation from the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

Read more about authorisation here

What are the conditions for the researcher track?

If you are offered a position as a researcher, you are able to use the researcher track.

There must be specific research-related reasons for offering you the position as a researcher. This means that the position must be closely connected to you and that the main purpose of your stay must be to do research. 

Please note, that guest researchers and PhD students are not included in the research track. 

If you are a guest researcher, you can find further information here

If you are a PhD student, you can find further information here

If you are invited as a researcher, scientist or speaker to teach for shorter than a 90 days period, you may not need a residence and work permit.

Read more about the rules of exemption here.

The same applies if you are going to work as a researcher at a university or a company in Denmark, and the total duration of your stay, counted from your date of entry, is 90 days or less. 

Some foreign nationals must have obtained a visa valid for the full duration of their stay before entering Denmark. 

Read more about the conditions on visa and visa-free stays and about how to apply for a visa here.

If you know beforehand that you will be staying in Denmark for longer than 90 days, you must apply for a residence permit covering the first 90 days as well.

Your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account in a bank operating legally in Denmark.

It is not a requirement that the salary paid into the Danish bank account is transferred from a Danish bank account.

Likewise, there are no limitations to the type of bank account that can be used: for example, a currency account and a basic bank account can both be used.

The Danish bank account must be opened no later than 90 days after the date on which you have been granted a Danish residence and work permit. If you enter Denmark after having been granted a permit, the Danish bank account must be opened within 90 days from entry. If you already hold a permit which is valid for at least 3 months, your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account from the first salary payment.

You are not required to have your salary paid into a Danish bank account, if you apply for a residence permit as a researcher after the Fast track scheme and your stay does not exceed 180 days calculated from your date of entry to Denmark.

However, please note that you will be covered by the Danish bank account requirement, if your short-term employment is extended beyond 180 days.

The salary that you have been offered must not be less than the standard within the professional field in which you are going to work.

When assessing whether the salary you have been offered corresponds to Danish standards, only the following salary components can be taken into account:

  • Cash salary, including fixed supplements which therefore are guaranteed salary
  • Payments to labour market pension schemes, including pension contributions paid by the employer and contributions paid by the applicant
  • Paid holiday allowance 

If you earn holiday allowance, which can only be paid to you the following year, this cannot count towards the annual salary for the year in which you have earned it. Moreover, it is only holiday allowance paid by the specific employer that you are right now allowed to work for, that can be counted as part of your salary.

Your employer might offer you, as a supplement to your salary, benefits such as paid canteen, free use of car, paid phone, paid internet and paid living and housing expenses. Note that these salary components cannot be taken into account when assessing whether your salary corresponds to Danish standards.

Read more about Danish standards for salary

Your terms of employment, such as your holiday entitlements, terms of notice, etc. must not be inferior to the standards within the professional field in which you are going to work.

If SIRI has any doubts on whether your terms of employment correspond to Danish standards, we can ask the regional labour market councils to assess your terms of employment.

Read more about Danish standards for terms of employment

If you are invited as a researcher, scientist or speaker to teach for shorter than a 90 days period, you may not need a residence and work permit, since you may be covered by the rules of exemption.

Read more about the rules of exemption here

The same applies if you are going to work as a researcher at a university or a company in Denmark, and the total duration of your stay, counted from your date of entry, is 90 days or less. 

If you are a foreign nationals from a country with a visa requirement, you must obtain a valid visa for the full duration of your stay before entering Denmark. 

Read more about the conditions for visa and visa-free stays and about how to apply for a visa here

If you know beforehand that you will be staying in Denmark for longer than 90 days, you must apply for a residence permit that also covers the first 90 days of your stay.

If you, aside from your primary job, wish to be affiliated with one or more Danish universities as a researcher, or you obtain other sideline employment, you do not need a specific permit for it.

You can find more information on the rights you get with a permit under the Fast-track scheme here

You can find more about sideline employment here

Full time employment is not a requirement for researchers, but you need to have a contract or a specific employment agreement which shows that your salary and terms of employment conform to Danish standards.

With a permit as a researcher after the Fast-track scheme, your job content can change within the same university or company without you having to apply for a new work permit. For example, this applies if you are promoted or if your research project changes. Salary and terms of employment must continue to correspond to Danish standards.

You must inform SIRI if your salary and terms of employment deteriorate.

Being an examiner or doing other examination tasks can be so closely linked to your position as a researcher at a Danish University that it may come naturally to seek appointment as an examiner.

As a researcher you may be allocated as an examiner or do examination tasks at different university from the one employing you, without needing to apply for a work permit for sideline employment.This applies to both written and oral examinations.

SIRI suggests that you send a copy of your appointment from the corps of censors so there is no doubt that you have been appointed as examiner or to other examination tasks.

What are the conditions for the educational track?

If you are a highly qualified foreign national with significant work experience within a certain professional field, the educational track is of relevance to you, provided that:

  • the purpose of your stay in Denmark is to receive highly qualified training in the certified company, or
  • the purpose is that you will be training other employees in the certified company at a highly qualified level. 

If you are applying for a permit via this track, your employer must detail the educational purpose of your stay.

If you are applying for a permit via this track, your employer must describe the educational purpose of your stay.

The description must be attached to the application.

As a trainee, you are not able to obtain a permit using the educational track. A trainee stay does not imply education on a sufficiently high level to meet the requirement of this track. 

You can read more about the trainee scheme here

Your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account in a bank operating legally in Denmark.

It is not a requirement that the salary paid into the Danish bank account is transferred from a Danish bank account.

Likewise, there are no limitations to the type of bank account that can be used: for example, a currency account and a basic bank account can both be used.

The Danish bank account must be opened no later than 90 days after the date on which you have been granted a Danish residence and work permit. If you enter Denmark after having been granted a permit, the Danish bank account must be opened within 90 days from entry. If you already hold a permit which is valid for at least 3 months, your salary must be paid into a Danish bank account from the first salary payment.

The salary that you have been offered must not be less than the standard within the professional field in which you are going to work.

When assessing whether the salary you have been offered corresponds to Danish standards, only the following salary components can be taken into account:

  • Cash salary, including fixed supplements which therefore are guaranteed salary
  • Payments to labour market pension schemes, including pension contributions paid by the employer and contributions paid by the applicant
  • Paid holiday allowance 

If you earn holiday allowance, which can only be paid to you the following year, this cannot count towards the annual salary for the year in which you have earned it. Moreover, it is only holiday allowance paid by the specific employer that you are right now allowed to work for, that can be counted as part of your salary.

Your employer might offer you, as a supplement to your salary, benefits such as paid canteen, free use of car, paid phone, paid internet and paid living and housing expenses. Note that these salary components cannot be taken into account when assessing whether your salary corresponds to Danish standards.

Read more about Danish standards for salary

Your terms of employment, such as your holiday entitlements, terms of notice, etc. must not be inferior to the standards within the professional field in which you are going to work.

If SIRI has any doubts on whether your terms of employment correspond to Danish standards, we can ask the regional labour market councils to assess your terms of employment.

Read more about Danish standards for terms of employment

It is a condition that you work full time. As a rule, this mean 37-40 working hours a week.

A residence and work permit cannot be granted for a job that is covered by a legal labour dispute.

A permit can be given for other jobs in a company affected by a dispute, if these jobs are not covered by the conflict according to the rules of labour law.

In some instances, it is required that you have a Danish authorisation or a temporary authorisation for employment for adaption and training purposes before you can be granted a residence and work permit.

If you have taken up employment for adaption and training purposes in order to obtain a Danish authorisation, you need to have a temporary authorisation (evalueringsautorisation) issued by the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

If you have been offered employment as a medical doctor, you need to obtain an authorisation from the Danish Patient Safety Authority.

Read more about authorisation here

It is a condition that your spouse, cohabiting partner, child or any other family member, who holds a residence permit as an accompanying family member, must not have had his or her residence permit revoked more than once due to the lack of a required specific work permit.

How can I get a quick job start?

The Fast-track scheme provides you with the possibility of a quick job start. 

There are two ways to get a quick job start depending on whether you have legal access to enter into Denmark or not. 

If you do not need a quick job start, you can wait for SIRI to make a decision on your case within our service goals.

If you do not make use of the possibility to have a quick job start, using the Fast-track scheme will still exempt you from the rules on when your permit lapses [link].

If the company in which you will be employed is certified for using the Fast-track scheme, the company has received instructions in how to get a quick job start. You can see the procedure here:

If you can enter into Denmark legally, e.g. if you are exempt from the visa requirement or you have a valid Schengen visa, you and your employer must do the following:  

  • Your employer must submit an application for a permit via the Fast-track scheme with a power of attorney from you.

  • Subsequently, your employer must make an appointment for a meeting with SIRI for you to get a provisional work permit. The appointment is made via a link on the receipt that your employer receives when submitting the application or by appointment with your employer’s contact person in SIRI.

  • At last, you must appear in SIRI’s Citizen Centre at the appointed time. You must bring your passport and receipt showing that the application has been submitted. At the meeting SIRI will do a number of checks, such as identity check, check if you are registered as unwanted in the Schengen area, and a check to make sure that you have entered into a contract with the certified company. In addition, SIRI will check if the case processing fee has been paid. Your biometric data will also be recorded.

If you meet the requirements, you will immediately be granted a provisional work permit meaning that you can start working right away.

If you are required to have a visa and you cannot enter into Denmark legally to appear in SIRI, you and your employer must do the following to obtain a quick job start.

  • Your employer must submit an application for a permit via the Fast-track scheme with a power of attorney form you. You can find a template for a power of attorney here
  • Subsequently, your employer must send a message to SIRI stating that you need a quick job start. This is done by using SIRI's contact form (choose the option "I wish to submit documentation or new information regarding a case at SIRI"). The Case Order ID (SB-ID) and the reference number mentioned on the submission receipt must be stated in the message. 
  • No later than 14 days after submitting the application, you must have your biometric data recorded at the nearest Danish diplomatic mission.
  • When the biometric data has been recorded, SIRI will grant you a residence and work permit provided that you meet the conditions.
  • SIRI authorises the Danish diplomatic mission to issue a long-term visa (visa type D) to enable you to travel to Denmark. 

Usually, if your employer submits the application on a day when our Citizen Centre is open, and if you are exempt from the visa requirement or you can enter into Denmark legally in any other way, you can be granted a provisional work permit on the date of submission. This of course presupposes that there are available appointments to book in the Citizen Centre. 

If you cannot enter into Denmark legally, we will typically make a decision no later than 10 days from receiving your application with biometrics and paid case processing fee.

What are my rights, if I am granted a permit?

What are you allowed to do with a Danish residence and work permit via the Pay Limit scheme? – and what are you not allowed to do?

You are only allowed to work in the job and in the company that you have been granted a permit to work in.

With a permit under the Fast Track Scheme, your job content can change within the same university or company without you having to apply for a new work permit. For example, this applies if you are promoted or if your place of work changes. Salary and employment conditions must still correspond to the Danish standards.

If you are granted a permit on the Pay Limit Track then your salary must continue to correspond at least to the pay limit.

Please note that your work permit can expire before your residence permit. This happens if you have been granted a permit to stay in Denmark for a period of time while looking for a new job.

It is important that you do not work during this so called job seeking period as it is only intended for job seeking in Denmark.

If you are offered a new job, you must apply for a new permit.  

 

If you wish to take a sideline job, you have to obtain a separate permit. With a residence permit on the researcher track you are exempt for the requirement for a work permit for sideline employment with other employers; as a result you do not apply for a specific permit for sideline employment.

You can read more about sideline employment here.

Furthermore you are allowed to take up unpaid voluntary work.

A Danish residence and work permit does not allow you to work in other Schengen countries.

You can read more about working conditions in Denmark and 'The Danish labour market model' here.

A residence and work permit based on the Fast-track Scheme allows you to stay in Denmark for the period of time your permit is valid. 

In addition, a permit allows you to stay in the Schengen area for up to 90 days within the latest 180 days period. The permit, however, does not allow you to work in other Schengen countries.

Normally, with a Danish residence permit, you must not give up your Danish address or stay abroad for longer than 6 successive months. A violation will result in the lapse of your permit

With a permit based on the Fast-track scheme, you are exempt from these rules that can cause your permit to lapse. Hence, you are allowed to give up your Danish address if you stay abroad for a period of time.

If you are granted a job seeking permit after the expiry of your employment contract, the exemption from the rules that can cause your permit to lapse does not apply during the job seeking period.  

If you periodically reside abroad and do not receive the salary stated when you applied for a residence and work permit, you and your employer must be able to provide documentation that you have not been residing in Denmark during the periods in question. 

This can be documented by providing the following documentation:

  • Deregistration from the CPR registry if you are residing outside of Denmark for more than 90 days

  • Boarding pass

  • Stamps in your passport

  • Information or data from your company’s HR department – e.g. a statement of leave

  • Documentation of received salary abroad

Your employer can be requested to provide this documentation if you apply for extension of your permit or as a part of our verification and spot-check procedures.

You must be able to support yourself and your family during your stay. You are not allowed to receive benefits under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act, e.g. social security benefits.

If you or your family members receive such benefits during your stay, your permit can be revoked – and you will lose the right to stay in Denmark.

If an authority, e.g. a municipality, disburses benefits to foreign nationals, SIRI will be notified.

 You can see a list of benefits that you are not allowed to receive here.

With a residence permit in Denmark, you are entitled to free Danish lessons. However, you must have turned 18 years and have your Danish address registered in the Danish National Register.

If you have a residence permit in Denmark based on work, study, etc. you have to pay a deposit before you can start receiving lessons. Be aware that you can lose your deposit if you do not pass the different modules within a specific timeframe.

Your municipality of residence is obliged to offer you Danish lessons and refer you to a language centre. If you have not been offered Danish lessons within a month after registering your address in Denmark, you can contact your municipality. 

You will (typically) be taught together with other foreign nationals who have arrived in Denmark recently.

If you are going to stay and work in Denmark, there are a number of things to acquaint yourself with. Depending on your personal situation, you might need other important information and options.

The portal lifeindenmark.dk provides you with information, links and in many cases also options concerning the most important subjects such as:

  • NemID

  • The CPR register

  • Health card

  • Tax matters

  • Holiday entitlements 

  • School and daycare

  • Housing

  • Danish lessons

  • Car registration and driver’s license

How long can I stay in Denmark?

If you apply from abroad, you can be granted a residence permit valid for 1 month before you start working. It will give you the time to settle in Denmark. When you apply, you must declare that you can support yourself and any accompanying family members during this time.  If you do not declare this, your residence permit will be valid for 14 days before you start working.

If you apply in Denmark, your residence permit will be valid from the day you start working.

A residence permit can only be valid until 90 days before the expiry date of your passport.

If your passport has a shorter validity than the otherwise possible period of stay, your residence permit will be shortened. This means that the validity of your residence permit will be shorter than it could be. When you have renewed your passport, you can apply for an extension of your residence permit – however, this can only be done 90 days before your permit expires at the earliest. 

Read more about the passport requirements.

A permit for a short-term stay can have a maximum duration of 90 days within a period of 1 year.

The permit cannot be extended, but the 90 days can be divided into several stays.

Each stay must be applied for individually and the combined period must not exceed 90 days from entering Denmark the first time.

The 3 months are counted from your date of entry into Denmark.

If the duration of your employment contract is shorter than 90 days, your permit will expire 14 days later than the expiry of your contract – if possible within the limit of 90 days in total.

If you are employed for a shorter period than 4 years, your residence and work permit will normally be valid for the period of your employment. If you wish to continue working in Denmark after this time, you must apply for an extension of your residence and work permit.

In addition, you will automatically be granted a 6 month job seeking permit allowing you to look for a new job in Denmark.

You are not allowed to work during your job seeking period. 

If you find a new job, you must submit a new application based on the new job – it can either be based on the Fast-track scheme or it can be based on another of our work schemes. When you have submitted your application based on the new job, you do not have to wait for your permit before you start working. You can start your new job on the day you submit the new application.

If your employment contract is extended, you must apply for an extension of your residence and work permit. 

It is very important that you apply for an extension before your permit expires.

If you submit your application for an extension in time, you can stay in Denmark and continue to work even though your permit is expiring.

If your employment is for a period of 4 years or more, you will normally be granted a permit valid for 4 years. If you wish to continue to work after the first 4 year, you must apply for an extension of your residence and work permit based on the extension of your employment.  

It is very important that you apply for an extension before your permit expires.

If you submit your application for an extension in time, you can stay in Denmark and continue to work, even though your permit is expiring.

What should I do, if I lose or change my job?

If you are granted a permit based on this scheme, your residence permit is linked to your job in Denmark. Your employment is the basis for your permit.

You must always inform SIRI if you lose or change your job.

Your work permit is limited to the employment that is the basis for your permit.  You are not allowed to work in other positions than the one stated in your permit.

You must inform SIRI if you lose your job. Your residence and work permit will be revoked as it is based on this exact job. 

However, if you become unemployed through no fault of your own, e.g. due to cutbacks, you can apply for an extra 6 month residence permit allowing you to look for a new job in Denmark. 

You must apply for a job seeking permit no later than 2 days after your employment ends.

Please note that you cannot be granted a job seeking permit if your permit is based on track 4 – the short-term stay.

You are not allowed to work while you have a job seeking permit.

If you find a new job, you must apply for a new residence and work permit based on one of our work schemes. When you have submitted your new application, you can start working even though you have not been granted a permit yet. More about this job change rule here.

If you find a new job while working in Denmark, you must submit a new application for a residence and work permit with information on your new employment. When you have submitted your new application, you can start working even though SIRI has not granted you a permit yet.

Please note that with a permit under the Fast Track Scheme, your job content can change within the same university or company without you having to apply for a new work permit. For example, this applies if you are promoted or if your place of work changes. Salary and employment conditions must still correspond to the Danish standards.

On the Pay Limit Track your salary must continue to correspond at least to the pay limit.

Can my family be granted a residence permit?

A residence and work permit based on a job in Denmark allows your family to come with you to Denmark. 

A permit can be granted to your spouse, registered or cohabiting partner as well as children under the age of 18 living at home.

Read more about accompanying family members here.

Your family will also be exempt from the rules that can cause their permits to lapse. They are allowed to give up their Danish address in periods when staying abroad, and they are allowed to stay abroad for longer than 6 successive months. 

What more do I need to know before I apply?

An application for a residence permit based on the Fast-track scheme is processed by the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI). If you are in Denmark when submitting the application, you must be here legally. More about submission here

You must have an employment agreement with a company registered in Denmark and certified by SIRI to be able to apply.

Before submitting the application, you must create a case order ID for the application and pay a fee to cover SIRI’s case processing expenses. You can do this on the “How to apply” tab to the right. Your employer can be the one to create the case order ID and pay the fee.

On the “How to apply” tab to the right, you and your employer can also find the application form that your employer must fill in – AR6.

You must grant your employer power of attorney to handle the application on your behalf.

You can find an approved template for a power of attorney here.

Please note that, as a rule, SIRI will refuse your application for a residence permit on new grounds, if the application is submitted prematurely in relation to the wished for start date for your stay in Denmark. 

If you submit such an application earlier than 6 months before your stay in Denmark will begin, you can expect a refusal to your application. If you have paid SIRI's case processing fee, you will not receive a refund of the fee.

SIRI will contact you or your employer if we need further information to process your case.

This tab is directed at employers who will be submitting an application on behalf of the applicant.

Below you will find a step-by-step guide to submitting an application to the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI).

It is important that you and the applicant have carefully read the conditions for being granted a residence permit before you begin step 1. You can do this on the tab “Need to know” on the left.

If the applicant is a commuter who will not be residing in Denmark and for this reason will only apply for a work permit, you do not need to create a case order ID or pay a fee. Instead you kan go directly to step 3. Read more about commuting here.

When submitting an application or appeal with a fee, you must first create a case order ID.

Case type:

The fast track scheme

Fee:

DKK 4,405,-

Information about the applicant

The information is incorrect
The information is incorrect

Are you sure you do not want to receive a receipt by mail?

The information is incorrect

Are you exempt from paying the fee?

Are you sure a fee is not required to be paid in your case?

Only certain applicants are exempt from paying a fee. If the immigration authorities decide at a later stage that the applicant/appelant is not exempt from paying a fee, the application/appeal will be rejected.
If you have paid a fee and the following case handling shows that the fee should not have been paid, the whole fee will be refunded.

In certain cases the fee is not warranted (fee exemption). Examples are:

  • The Association Agreement between the EU and Turkey
  • Denmark’s international obligations

You are still required to create a case order ID, even if you are not required to pay a fee.

If you have paid a fee and it is not warranted, the whole fee will be refunded.

Read more about Fee exemption

The information is incorrect

All fees are regulated every year on 1 January. Make sure to create your Case Order ID, pay the fee and submit your application in the same calendar year. If you pay the fee before 1 January and submit your application after 1 January, your application may be rejected.

If no case order ID is shown in the field below, please type your case order ID and click on View payment status.

The information is incorrect The information is incorrect
The information is incorrect

Payment options

You must submit

Expect to use

30 minutes

completing the application

1 person

The employer completes the application form.

In this step you have access to the relevant application form, AR6.

Make sure that you have completed all the preceeding steps before you begin.

All our application forms contain careful instructions on how to complete the form and what kind of documents you must submit along with the form.

You can read more about how we process your personal data here.

You need a power of attorney from the applicant in order to use the form AR6

Read more about power of attorney and download an approved power of attorney standard here.

Make sure you have all documents ready in digital form, in order to attach them as you complete the application form.

 

Use the online form AR6

When applying for a residence permit, the applicant must have his or her biometric features recorded.

This means that the applicant must have a facial photo taken and his or her fingerprints recorded. The facial photo and fingerprints will be stored on a microchip embedded in the residence card, which will be issued to the applicant if he or she is granted a permit.

SIRI can only begin processing the application after biometrics have been recorded by the applicant. This must happen no later than 14 days after the submission date of the application.

If you do not agree to have your biometric features recorded, your application will be rejected. This means that your application will not be processed.

Read more about biometrics here.

If you want a quick job start

If you want to make use of the option of a quick job start, you can go directly to the next steps.

If you do not want a quick job start

The applicant must have his or her biometric features recorded no later than 14 days after you submit the application.

Your biometric features can be recorded at

In certain countries Denmark does not have a diplomatic mission or application centre. In these instances the list will refer the applicant to one of the Norwegian missions with which Denmark has made an agreement or to the nearest Danish diplomatic mission or application centre in the region.

If the applicant is residing in a country where he is referred to a Norwegian diplomatic mission, he or she must submit one passport photo. If he or she is granted a residence permit based on the application, the applicant must have his or her biometric features recorded within a specifi time frame after entry to Denmark

We recommend that you visit the local diplomatic mission’s webpage to get more information before you submit the application. The individual diplomatic mission can have additional requirements regarding payment of additional fees, submission of additional passport photos or additional copies of the application.

You want a quick job start – and the applicant is already in Denmark

If the application has been submitted and the applicant is residing legally in Denmark, since the applicant

  • is holding a valid visa,
  • is exempt from the visa requirement or
  • already holds a valid residence permit.

the applicant can appear in SIRI’s Citizen Centre and ask for a provisional permit in order to begin working immediately. You must book an appointment via a link in the receipt the employer receives after submitting the application or by contacting the employers contact person at SIRI. It is not possible to book an appointment for this meeting here on newtodenmark.dk.

At the meeting SIRI will perform a number of checks, including an identity check, a check that the applicant has not been registered as unwanted in the Schengen area and the employer is a certified company. In addition, we will check that the processing fee has been paid. Finally, the foreign national's biometric features must be recorded. 

The applicant must bring the following to the meeting

You want a quick job start – you are staying abroad and cannot travel to Denmark without a visa

If the application has been submitted, and you need a visa in order to travel legally to Denmark, your employer must notify SIRI that you want a quick job start.

Your employer can notify SIRI by using SIRI's contact form and by choosing "I wish to enquire or submit documentation related to a specific case" 

Your employer must state the case order ID used in the application and the reference number stated in the receipt for the online application.

You must then as soon as possible have your biometrics recorded at the nearest Danish diplomatic mission or application centre. This must happen no later than 14 days after submitting the application.

You have submitted your application succesfully if you have:

  • created a case order ID
  • paid the fee
  • submitted the application
  • had your biometric features recorded

You can see the normal case processing time to the right on this page. When we make a decision in your case, you will receive an answer.

SIRI will contact you if we need further information to process your case.

If you have asked for a quick job start from abroad, we will typically make a decision no later than 10 days after we have received the application incl. biometircs and the processing fee. However, this requires that we have all the necessary information.

Responsible Agency

Contact SIRI