The expected maximum processing time is
10 months

The fee is
DKK 6,380,-

Who can be granted family reunification of spouses?

What are the requirements?

Who can be dispensated from meeting the requirements?

Which type of residence permit will you be granted?

Who can be granted family reunification of spouses?

If you have a spouse/partner living in Denmark, you may qualify for a residence permit in Denmark under the rules for family reunification.

You and your spouse/partner need to meet certain requirements.

Special rules apply to the groups below:

What are the requirements?

In order to qualify for family reunification, you, the applicant, and your spouse/partner both need to meet certain requirements. 

Requirements you both need to meet

Legally valid marriage

If you are married, your marriage needs to be legal under Danish law. In order for your marriage to be declared valid in Denmark, it needs to have been valid in the country where it took place. A marriage can’t be declared valid in Denmark if it violates Danish laws.

This means that:

  • Both you and your spouse need to have been present during the wedding ceremony
  • Neither you nor your spouse can have been represented by someone else during the wedding ceremony
  • You and your spouse need to have turned 18 at the time of the wedding

If you are not married, or if your marriage can’t be validated in Denmark, the Immigration Service will instead assess whether you have been permanent cohabitants, and if this can be used as grounds for qualifying for a residence permit.

Permanent cohabitation

The Immigration Service defines ‘permanent cohabitation’ as living together at the same address for a minimum of 18 months. Read more about documenting whether you and your partner have been permanent cohabitants

If special situations apply, the Immigration Service can suspend the 18-month requirement. For more information, see the Ministry of Integration’s memorandum of 9 May 2007 (in Danish only)

Your partner in Denmark needs to assume responsibility for supporting you financially if you need it. The application form includes a statement declaring that your partner assumes responsibility for supporting you. Your partner needs to sign this statement.

The Immigration Service will not grant you a residence permit if it is doubtful that either you or your spouse/partner entered into your marriage/relationship voluntarily.

The Immigration Service looks at all aspects of your application when assessing this.

If you and your spouse/partner are closely related, the Immigration Service will most likely find that your marriage/relationship is not voluntary.

If others in your immediate family have been involved in a forced marriage, the Immigration Service will most likely find that your marriage/relationship is not voluntary.

Examples of the things the Immigration Service will look at when evaluating your marriage/relationship are:

  • The wedding and the contact you had with your spouse before you got married
  • Your age
  • How long you have been married
  • How much contact you had with each other’s families before getting married
  • Your finances, work history, educational history and other personal details
  • Information about any contact that either of you have had with a crisis or counselling centre

The Immigration Service may also consider the role your families had in the marriage. But just because your parents or your spouse’s parents were involved in arranging your marriage does not make it a forced marriage.

For more information, see the Ministry of Integration’s memorandum about forced marriage (in Danish only)

Counselling for young people who risk being forced into marriage

You can get counselling from the Immigration Service if you are about to get married and it is not fully in accordance with your own wishes. Read more about counselling 
 

A marriage or relationship that has the primary goal of qualifying you for a residence permit will be considered a ‘marriage of convenience’. The Immigration Service will look at all aspects of your application to determine whether your marriage/relationship is a marriage of convenience, or whether it qualifies you for a residence permit.

Examples of the things the Immigration Service will look at when evaluating your marriage/relationship are:

  • Whether you and your spouse/partner have lived together
  • Whether you can communicate in the same language
  • Whether there is a big age difference between you and your spouse/partner
  • How well you knew each other before getting married/moving in with each other
  • Your previous marriages
  • Whether you have children together
  • Whether your spouse/partner in Denmark previously sponsored someone for family reunification, and then divorced the individual shortly after he/she was granted a permanent residence permit.
     

You and your spouse/partner normally need to be at least 24 years old in order for you to qualify for family reunification. This is known as the 24-year requirement.

You may submit your application for family reunification when the younger spouse/partner is 23 years and 6 months.

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend the 24-year requirement in special situations, such as if you, the applicant’s spouse/partner in Denmark:

In order to qualify for a residence permit, you and your spouse/partner normally need to fulfil an integration requirement. You and your spouse/partner will collectively need to meet 4 out of a total of 6 integration-related conditions. 3 of the conditions apply to you, the applicant, and 3 apply to your spouse/partner in Denmark. One of the conditions that apply to your spouse/partner must always be met. There is no requirement as to which 3 of the remaining 5 conditions you need to satisfy.

Read more about the individual conditions in the ‘Requirements the applicant needs to meet’ and the ‘Requirements the spouse/partner in Denmark needs to meet’ sections below.

Exemptions from the integration requirement

You may be exempt from meeting the immigration requirement under certain circumstances, such as if your spouse/partner in Denmark:

• is raising minor children who have an attachment of their own to Denmark, or if he/she has contact with minor children from a previous relationship. Read more about minor children

• is seriously ill or has a serious disability. Read more about serious illness/disability

 

You, the applicant, and your spouse/partner in Denmark will both be asked to declare that you will actively participate in your efforts to learn Danish and to integrate into Danish society. If you have children who will be accompanying you to Denmark, you and your spouse/partner will also be asked to actively participate in their Danish-language learning and integration.

You and your spouse/partner promise to do so by signing a statement included in the application form.

Requirements the applicant needs to meet

You, the applicant will normally need to have visited Denmark at least once.

There is no minimum requirement for the length of your visit, but you need to have been in Denmark legally (meaning that you entered from another EU country, you held a residence permit, you held a visa or were covered by a visa-waiver programme).

You do not meet this requirement if you e.g. entered Denmark as an asylum seeker.

Exemptions from the visitation requirement

You may be exempt from meeting the visitation requirement under certain circumstances, such as if your spouse/partner in Denmark:

 

Normally, you and your spouse/partner in Denmark collectively need to meet 4 out of a total of 6 integration-related conditions. 3 of the conditions apply to you, the applicant, and 3 apply to your spouse/partner in Denmark. If, for example, your spouse/partner meets all 3 of the conditions that apply to him/her, then you would only need to meet 1 of those that apply to you. If, on the other hand, your spouse only meets 1 condition, you would need to meet all 3 that apply to you.

The 3 conditions you can meet in order to fulfil the integration requirement are explained below.

You need to have passed Prøve i Dansk1 or an English language test at the B1 level

You meet one of the conditions of the integration requirement if you have passed Prøve i Dansk 1 or another Danish language test of an equal or higher level. Alternately, you can satisfy the condition by passing an English language test at the B1 level or another English test that are equivalent to or at a higher level

Prøve i Dansk 1 is the test administered at the end of Danskuddannelse 1, a Danish course for adult aliens in Denmark. See which tests can replace Prøve i Dansk 1

In order to satisfy the English language condition, you, the applicant, need to document that you have passed an English test, administered by a recognised language-training organisation, at the B1 level.

See which tests can be approved as documentation of English language skills at the B1 level

You need to have worked full-time for at least 3 of the past 5 years

You meet one of the conditions of the integration requirement if you have worked for at least 3 of the last 5 years prior to applying for a residence permit.

In order to meet this condition, you need either to have held a regular, full-time position, or been self-employed. Employment in Denmark (if you have previously held a work and residence permit) and work abroad both count towards this condition.

Regular work should be understood to mean either that your position is covered by a collective bargaining agreement or that your pay and working conditions are normal for the position. If your employer received a public subsidy to cover a portion of your wages, the position does not qualify as regular work. Internships or other positions that are a part of an educational programme do not qualify as regular work.

Full-time work should be understood to mean an average work week of at least 30 hours.

Periods of self-employment can be counted towards this condition if the activity was your primary occupation, and your intention was to use it as a means to support yourself financially. The amount of time you spent working for yourself each week needs to have been comparable to 30 hours of regular employment.

You also satisfy this condition if you have reached the pensionable age in your home country, since retirement can be considered as a period of employment if it was preceded by a period of full-time employment.

You need to have completed at least 1 year of education

You satisfy one of the conditions of the integration requirement if you have completed at least 1 year of education.

In order to satisfy this condition, your educational programme needs to have been offered by an accredited organisation. Completing an accredited educational programme means, for example, that you are considered certified in your field, and that the quality of your programme is regulated by the laws of your home country.

Comparable programmes in Denmark are defined as vocational (erhvervsuddannelse) or post-secondary education programmes. Vocational programmes in Denmark, including a vocational baccalaureate programme (erhvervsfaglig studentereksamen i forbindelse med erhvervsuddannelse), are offered by technical schools, social and health schools, business colleges and agricultural schools, as well as other types of private and public educational institutions, such as AMU schools, the military and private-sector businesses.

If you completed an educational programme but did not pass the final exam, it cannot be counted towards this condition.

You do not need have completed your programme if it lasts longer than 1 year. For example, you would meet this condition if you completed the first year of a 3 year programme. If you completed the first year of a multi-year programme but were not required to do an examination, you will need to provide a statement from your school verifying your enrolment.

Educational programmes that are the equivalent of Danish upper-secondary education (gymnasiale uddannelser) cannot be counted towards this condition. Danish upper-secondary programmes include, STX (upper-secondary school exam), HHX (higher commercial exam), HTX (higher technical exam) and HF (the higher preparatory exam).

Exemptions from the integration requirement

You may be exempt from meeting the immigration requirement under certain circumstances, such as if your spouse/partner in Denmark:

• is raising minor children who have an attachment of their own to Denmark, or if he/she has contact with minor children from a previous relationship. Read more about minor children

• is seriously ill or has a serious disability. Read more about serious illness/disability

 

If you are approved for family reunification and granted a residence permit, first you will need to pass a test in Danish at the A1 level or higher, and hereafter you will need to pass a test in Danish at A2 level or higher. Read more about tests in Danish and how to register

Normally, you will need to pass a test at A1 level within 6 months of being granted a residence permit. You will normally need to pass a test at A2 level within 9 months of being granted residence permit. Read more about deadlines for passing a test in Danish

If you don’t pass the tests in time, your residence permit can be revoked.

Exceptions from the requirement

In special situations, the Immigration Service can suspend the requirement that you pass a test in Danish, such as if your spouse/partner in Denmark:

If you are blind, deaf or have some other form of disability that prevents you from taking the exam, you might not need to take the exam.

Certain Turkish citizens do not need to take the tests in Danish. Read more about the special circumstances that apply to economically active Turkish citizens
 

Requirements the spouse/partner in Denmark needs to meet

You, the spouse/partner of the applicant, need to live in Denmark and have an independent, reasonably sized residence at your disposal. This is known as the housing requirement.

An independent residence is a residence that has an entrance of its own and appears as one unit. An independent residence does not need to have a kitchen or bathroom of its own.

You have a residence at your disposal if you own, rent or sublet the place where you live. Owning property collectively as an andelshaver or anpartshaver also satisfies this requirement.

Your residence needs to be reasonably sized. This means that by the time your spouse/partner is approved for family reunification, your residence needs to meet one of the following requirements:

  • the number of people living in the residence may not be more than double the number of rooms, or
  • there must be at least 20 sq. metres of living space for each person living there.

Read more about the housing requirement

If you have recently returned to Denmark

If you recently returned to Denmark after having lived abroad for an extended period of time, the Immigration Service can extend the deadline for meeting the housing requirement by up to six months after the applicant has been granted a residence permit. In order to qualify for an extension, you normally need to apply for family reunification within a month of returning to Denmark.

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend the housing requirement in special situations, such as if you:

You, the applicant’s spouse/partner, will normally be required to reside in an area that is not mentioned in the current regulation about housing requirement list. See the current version of the housing requirement list (in Danish only)

A more detailed overview of the addresses that are part of the housing requirement list has been made. However the addresses can be changed due to roads getting new names etc. The overview is therefor only intended as a guide. In case of changes it is the housing requirement list that is in force. See the detailed overview of addresses that are part of the housing requirement list (in Danish only)

Areas of residence are placed on the list when they meet certain criteria regarding the levels of employment, crime, education and income there. The housing requirement list will be updated 1 December 2019.

Your residence must not be placed in an area mentioned on the housing requirement list at the time your spouse/partner submits his/her application for family reunification. If the area where your residence is located is later included on the housing requirement list, you will still meet this requirement.

If, after your spouse/partner submits his/her application, you move to an area that is mentioned on the housing requirement list, your residence will no longer meet this requirement.

Exemptions

Under certain circumstances, you may be exempt from the conditions on where your residence may be located, such as if you are:

 

Normally you, the applicant’s spouse/partner in Denmark, need to be able to support yourself. This requirement means that if you have received certain forms of social benefits at any time in the past three years, your spouse/partner can’t be approved for family reunification. The forms of social benefits that will prevent your spouse/partner from being approved for family reunification are those made under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act (lov om aktiv socialpolitik) or the Integration Act (integrationsloven).

Read more about social benefits and the self-support requirement

Even short periods on social benefits such as cash benefits (kontanthjælp) in the past three years can be enough to prevent you from meeting the self-support requirement.

For more information, see the Ministry of Integration’s guidelines (in Danish only)

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend the self-support requirement in special situations, such as if you:

  • are raising minor children who have an attachment of their own to Denmark, or if you have contact with minor children from a previous relationship. Read more about minor children
  • are seriously ill or have a serious disability. Read more about serious illness/disability
  • received social benefits in connection with maternity leave and at the end of your maternity leave started (or will start) working again.

 

Normally, you, the spouse/partner of the applicant, will need to have DKK 100,000 (2018 level) set aside, if the application for family reunification of spouses is submitted on 1 July 2018 or after.

Normally, you, the spouse/partner of the applicant, will need to have DKK 55,375.27 (2018 level) set aside, if the application for family reunification of spouses is submitted before 1 July 2018.

The guarantee must be set aside in order to be able to repay your municipality should it need to pay social benefits to the applicant.

This financial guarantee will be used to repay the municipality if the applicant receives social benefits under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act (lov om aktiv socialpolitik) or the Integration Act (integrationsloven).

The money can be available as a demand guarantee (anfordringsgaranti) or placed in an escrow account (deponeringskonto). Read more about the financial guarantee

The amount of money you need to have available can be reduced if your spouse/partner passes two tests in Danish. In some situations, the guarantee can be released entirely. Read more about reducing and eliminating the financial guarantee

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend the financial guarantee requirement in special situations, such as if you:

You, the spouse/partner of the applicant for family reunification, may not have been found guilty by a Danish court of assault or domestic violence involving a former spouse/partner within the past 10 years.

This requirement applies to convictions that resulted in jail or prison sentences you were required to serve. It also applies to convictions that resulted in suspended sentences, and to other forms of conviction that required (or could have required) you to be confined in some other way.

The crimes this requirement applies to include:

  • Rape (Section 216 of the Danish Criminal Code)
  • Manslaughter (Section 237 of the Danish Criminal Code)
  • Assault causing bodily harm and grievous bodily harm, including psychological violence (Sections 243-246 of the Danish Criminal Code)
  • Criminal coercion, including the use of coercion in connection with a forced marriage (Section 260 of the Danish Criminal Code)
  • Forced confinement (Section 261 of the Danish Criminal Code)
  • Human trafficking (Section 262 a of the Danish Criminal Code)

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend this requirement in special situations, such as if you:

  • were suffering from a psychiatric illness when the crime was committed. You may no longer be affected by the illness
  • committed the crime in connection with drug or alcohol abuse. You may no longer be a substance abuser
  • have been married for a long time, and you have lived together with your spouse for an extended period, and there is no doubt that you wish to resume living together.

Normally, you, the spouse/partner of an applicant, and the applicant collectively need to meet 4 out of a total of 6 integration-related conditions. 3 of the conditions apply to you, and 3 apply to the applicant.

If, for example, the applicant meets all 3 of the conditions that apply to him/her, then you only need to meet 1 of those that apply to you. If, on the other hand, the applicant only meets 1 condition, you need to meet all 3 that apply to you.

The 3 integration-related conditions that apply to you are described below. Please note that the first condition is mandatory and must always be met.

You need to have passed Prøve i Dansk 3 (mandatory)

You need to have passed Prøve i Dansk 3 or another Danish test at the same or higher level.

Other tests that meet this condition include:

  • studieprøven, with a score of 6 or higher (on the 13-point scale) or 02 (on the seven-point scale) in each of the four skills
  • an elementary school (folkeskolen) leaving exam (ninth or tenth year), with an average score of 6 or higher (on the 13-point scale) or 02 (on the seven-point scale) in Danish-language subjects (excluding effort)
  • STX (almen studentereksamen/upper-secondary school exam), HHX (merkantil studentereksamen/higher commercial exam) or HTX (teknisk studentereksamen/higher technical exam)
  • HF (the higher preparatory exam)
  • EUX (erhvervsfaglig studentereksamen i forbindelse med erhvervsuddannelse/vocational baccalaureate administered at the completion of vocational training)

See the complete list of exams that that can replace Prøve i Dansk 3

You need to have worked full-time for at least 5 years

You meet one of the conditions of the integration requirement if you have worked in Denmark for at least 5 years. The 5 years of employment do not need to be consecutive or fall within a specific time frame. You need to either have held a regular, full-time position, or been self-employed for at least 5 years.

Regular work should be understood to mean either that your position is covered by a collective-bargaining agreement or that your pay and working conditions are normal for the position. If your employer received a public subsidy to cover a portion of your wages, the position does not qualify as regular work. Internships or other positions that are a part of an educational programme do not qualify as regular work.

Full-time work should be understood to mean an average work week of at least 30 hours.

Periods of self-employment can be counted towards this condition if the activity was your primary occupation, and your intention was to use it as a means to support yourself financially. The amount of time you spent working for yourself each week needs to have been comparable to 30 hours of regular employment.

You need at least 6 years of schooling

You meet one of the conditions of the integration requirement if you have at least 6 years of schooling in Denmark. Of the 6 years of schooling, at least 1 year needs to have been full-time enrolment at a secondary school (above 10. klasse). Schooling completed abroad cannot be counted towards this condition.

You need to have completed the required 6 years of schooling before your spouse/partner applies for a residence permit. You need to have been enrolled full-time for a least one full year in a vocational or trade school. This includes upper-secondary schools (gymnasiale uddannelser), vocational schools (erhvervsskoler) and accredited post-secondary educational institutions.

There are several types of upper-secondary degrees in Denmark, including STX (upper-secondary school exam), HHX (higher commercial exam), HTX (higher technical exam) and HF (the higher preparatory exam).

Vocational degrees, including a vocational baccalaureate issued at the completion of vocational training (erhvervsfaglig studentereksamen i forbindelse med erhvervsuddannelse), are offered by technical schools, social and health schools, business colleges and agricultural schools, as well as other types of private and public educational institutions, such as AMU schools, the military and private-sector businesses.

Enrolment at an accredited post-secondary educational institution can be counted towards this condition. The length of enrolment will be calculated based on the number of European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) points earned, with 60 ECTS points amounting to 1 year of full-time enrolment.

Exemptions from the integration requirement

You may be exempt from meeting the immigration requirement under certain circumstances, such as if you are:

 

Additional requirements for spouses/partners in Denmark who are not citizens of Denmark or another Nordic country

You need to have held a permanent residence permit at least the past three years.

If you were granted a permanent residence permit on the grounds of an application submitted before 15 March 2017, you also need to meet the transferred requirements for permanent residence permit. Read more about the transferred requirements for permanent residence permit 

Exceptions from the requirement

The Immigration Service can suspend the transferred requirements for permanent residence permit in certain situations, such as if you:

In addition, the Immigration Service can suspend individual transferred requirements if special circumstances or situations apply. Read more about suspending individual transferred requirements for permanent residency

Who can be dispensated from meeting the requirements?

The Immigration Service can suspend one or more of the requirements for family reunification if there are very special reasons why the requirement/requirements should not be enforced.

Under each requirement, you can read more about when the Immigration Service can suspend them.

The Immigration Service cannot determine whether it can suspend any of the requirements until you have submitted your application for family reunification.

Because applications are evaluated on a case-by-case basis, we can only give general information about exceptions. The information may not apply in your specific situation.
 

Which type of residence permit will you be granted?

 If your application for family reunification is approved, you will be granted a temporary residence permit, typically valid for two years. If you still meet the requirements for residency, your residence permit can be extended. Read more about extending residence permits

If you are granted a residence permit, you can work during the same period as the residence permit is valid.


The information below explains what you and your spouse/partner need to do when applying for a residence permit based on family reunification.

We recommend that you make sure you meet the requirements for family reunification before paying the application fee. Read more about the requirements in the ‘Need to know’ tab.

When submitting an application or appeal with a fee, you must first create a case order ID.

Case type:

Family Reunification

Fee:

DKK 6,380,-

Information about the applicant

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Are you sure you do not want to receive a receipt by mail?

The information is incorrect

Are you exempt from paying the fee?

Are you sure a fee is not required to be paid in your case?

Only certain applicants are exempt from paying a fee. If the immigration authorities decide at a later stage that the applicant/appelant is not exempt from paying a fee, the application/appeal will be rejected.
If you have paid a fee and the following case handling shows that the fee should not have been paid, the whole fee will be refunded.

In certain cases the fee is not warranted (fee exemption). Examples are:

  • The Association Agreement between the EU and Turkey
  • Denmark’s international obligations
  • Citizenship of the EU/EEA

You are still required to create a case order ID, even if you are not required to pay a fee.

If you have paid a fee and it is not warranted, the whole fee will be refunded.

Read more about Fee exemption

The information is incorrect

All fees are regulated every year on 1 January. Make sure to create your Case Order ID, pay the fee and submit your application in the same calendar year. If you pay the fee before 1 January and submit your application after 1 January, your application may be rejected.

If no case order ID is shown in the field below, please type your case order ID and click on View payment status.

The information is incorrect
The information is incorrect

Payment options

Pay using your Dankort, VISA or MasterCard

Pay by international bank transfer

Case Order ID:

Pay online using your Danish internet bank

Danish internet bank

This page tells you which information is required when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Pay using Danish internet bank

Please include the following information when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Order payment form and pay fee at a post office or in a bank

Order payment form

On this page you can order a payment form which you can use to pay the fee at a post office or in a bank. 

The payment form will be sent to the address you give below. 

You and your spouse/partner each need to fill in part of the application form. You will also need to enclose documentation. It is a good idea to gather the documentation before you start. 

You may need:

Your spouse/partner in Denmark may need:

Documentation for the transferred requirements:

Set aside

50 to 60 minutes

to fill in the application form.

2 persons

You and your spouse/partner each need to fill in part of the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose.

You can fill in the application form in Word format on your computer before printing it out. The application form is also available as a PDF file that can be printed out and filled in by hand.

 

Download form FA1 for print:

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information in the application form or on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

When processing your case, we may seek to verify the accuracy of the information you have given. Read more about verification at the Danish Immigration Service

Applying from outside Denmark

You can submit your application at a Danish mission (embassy or consulate), or an outsourcing office in the country where you live.

See the list of Danish missions or outsourcing offices where you can hand in your application

If there is no Danish mission or outsourcing offices in the country where you live, the list refers to missions Denmark shares a representation agreement with, e.g. Norway or Sweden. If there is no representation agreement, the list refers to the nearest Danish mission or outsourcing office in the region.

The Immigration Service recommends that you visit the website of the Danish mission before you submit your application. Individual offices might have additional requirements, such as extra passport photos or copies of your application.

Applying in Denmark

If you are in Denmark legally, you can normally submit your application in Denmark. This would be the case if you:

  • hold a valid visa
  • are not required to hold a visa, or
  • hold a valid Danish residence permit

You can submit your application to the Immigration Service at Citizen Service. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen you can also submit your application at a police station that is capable of recording biometric features. See the list of police stations capable of recording biometric features

You can also send your application to the Immigration Service in the post.

Read more about the rules for submitting your application in Denmark

When you submit your application, you will normally need to have your fingerprints recorded and a picture of your face taken. These are also known as your biometric features. Your biometric features are required in order for you to get a new residence card.

Read more about residence cards with fingerprints and facial pictures
 

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