The expected maximum processing time is
10 months

The fee (work or study) is
DKK 7,035,-

The fee (others) is
DKK 5,030,-

Who can be granted a permanent residence permit?

If you have turned 18 but are not 19, and you have worked full-time or studied continuously since completing primary school, leniet requirements apply when you apply for a permanent residence permit.

You need to meet certain requirements in order to qualify for a permanent residence permit as an 18-year-old.

If you have not worked full-time or studied continuously since completing primary school, you need to meet the same requirements as applicants who are older than 18. Read more about qualifying for permanent residence
 

What are the requirements?

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit as an 18-year-old, you, the applicant, need to meet a number of requirements.

You need to have turned 18 years in order to qualify for a permanent residence permit.

If you have turned 19 years, you cannot be granted a permanent residence permit meeting only the leniet requirements.
 

In order to be able to qualify for a residence permit according to the leniet requirements, you need to have been enrolled in school or had regular, full-time employment continuously since completing primary school (folkeskolen) and until you submit your application for permanent residence.

Regular employment should be understood to mean that your employer does not receive public funding, such as wage subsidies (løntilskud), in connection with your employment. Your pay and working conditions should also meet the level established in the applicable collective-bargaining agreement, or otherwise be considered normal for the position. Read more about which types of employment can be considered regular, full-time employment.

Full-time employment should be understood to mean minimum 30 hours per week, or minimum 120 hours per month, at a job in Denmark.

If, since completing primary school, you have had periods when you were neither enrolled in school nor working, you will not qualify for a permanent residence permit meeting only the relaxed requirements.
 

You need to have resided in Denmark legally for 8 years or longer. During the entire period, you need to have had a residence permit under terms of the Aliens Act sections 7-9 f, sections 9 i-9 n or section 9 p (residence permit granted on the grounds of family reunification, asylum, studies or work etc.).

Your current residence permit states which section of the Aliens Act applies to your situation.

One or more grounds for residence

One way to meet the 8-year residence requirement is by having the same residence permit (such as one based on family reunification) for the entire period.

You can also meet the requirement if you have had multiple residence permits during your period of residence. This would be the case if you were initially granted a residence permit based on family reunification, and then as a refugee.

Read more about how the 8-year residence requirement is calculated

You may not have been convicted of certain crimes.

If you were sentenced to less than six months’ incarceration, or if the sentence was suspended, you will be temporarily ineligible for a permanent residence permit.

If you were sentenced to more than six months’ incarceration, you are permanently ineligible for a permanent residence permit.

The list below provides an overview of certain types of sentences and how they affect your eligibility for permanent residence:

  • Suspended custodial sentence without terms about community service leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time the final verdict is given
  • Suspended custodial sentence with terms about community service leads to a 7-year and 6 months penalty period starting from the time the final verdict is given.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of less than 60 days leads to a 12-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of less than 60 days for violations of part 12 or part 13 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 18-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory custodial sentence of 60 days or more, but less than 6 months leads to a 15-year penalty period starting from the time of release.
  • Mandatory prison sentence of at least 6 months leads to being barred from being granted a permanent residence permit in Denmark. This applies to all types of crime.
  • Mandatory prison sentence of at least 60 days for violations of part 12 of the Danish criminal code (crimes against the independence and security of the state) or part 13 of the Danish criminal code (crimes against the constitution of the state and the higher state authorities, terrorism, etc.) or sections 210, 216, 222-224, section 225 cf. section 226, or sections 243-246 of the provisions of the Danish criminal code (specific crimes concerning family affairs, sexual offence and crimes of violence) leads to being barred from being granted a permanent residence permit in Denmark.
  • Sentence for working illegally in the country in accordance with Section 59 of the Aliens Act leads, when the person don’t have a residence permit in this country, to a 15-year penalty period, if subsequent offence 22 years and 6 months. The penalty period starts from the time of parole, the date of delivery of the final judgment, date of the parole’s expiration or date of the agreement on the fine, depending on which date entails the latest expiration of the penalty period.
  • Sentence for working illegally in the country in accordance with Section 59 of the Aliens Act leads, when the person has a residence permit in this country, for a subsequent offence to a 7-year penalty period. The penalty period starts from the time of parole, the date of delivery of the final judgment, date of the parole’s expiration or date of the agreement on the fine, depending on which date entails the latest expiration of the penalty period.
  • Youth sanction leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure.
  • A sentence to be placed in an ambulatory psychiatric treatment with possible hospitalization in accordance to part 68 or part 69 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 6-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 9 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be placed in psychiatric treatment in accordance to part 68 or part 69 of the Danish criminal code leads to a 9-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 12 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be committed to a mental hospital leads to a 12-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure. However, at least 15 years must pass from the date the final measure is given by the court.
  • A sentence to be placed in secure detention leads to a 30-year penalty period starting from the time of termination of the measure.

You may not have any overdue public debts. A debt is considered overdue if the public is entitled to payment of the debt, or if the amount due has not been repaid by the due date.

The following types of debt are those that are considered public debt. If you have overdue payments for any of the types of debt below, you cannot qualify for a permanent residence permit (conlusive list):

  • Social Service Act or Active Social Policy Act benefits that you are required by law to repay (such as overpaid social benefits)
  • Child support paid in advance
  • Day-care payment
  • Overpaid housing benefits
  • Housing-subsidy loan 
  • Taxes and levies, unless the amount in arrears is due to circumstances beyond your control

Other debts, such as student loans, bank loans or loans from a building society are not considered public debts and will not disqualify you from being granted a permanent residence permit.

Payment extension

You can still be granted a permanent residence permit if you have been granted an extension to repay outstanding debt. However, the amount you owe may not exceed DKK 120,819.14 (2020 level).

Being granted an extension means that the creditor (the state or municipality) has given the debtor (you) permission to postpone repayment of your debt until beyond the original due date. For example, SKAT, the Danish customs and tax administration, may award you an extension.

If you are uncertain whether you have been granted a payment extension, contact your municipality, SKAT or Udbetaling Danmark.

Repayment schedule

You cannot be granted a permanent residence permit if you have overdue public debts, even if you have been allowed to repay your debt in set number of instalments (also known as a repayment schedule).

If you have a repayment schedule, the state or municipality has agreed to let you pay back your debt in instalments, rather than as a lump sum. For example, you may agree to pay DKK 500 per month for three years.

If you repay your debt

If you repay an overdue public debt after you submit your application, but before the Immigration Service issues reaches a decision, you need to provide documentation showing you no longer have any public debt.

In order to qualify for a permanent residence permit you may not have received certain forms of social benefits within four years of applying for a permanent residence permit. Nor may you receive them until the time when the permanent residence permit is granted.

The decisive factor when evaluating whether you have received social benefits is whether they have been awarded under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act (lov om aktiv socialpolitik) or the Integration Act (integrationsloven). If you have received social benefits under the terms of either law, you can normally only be granted a permanent residence permit four years after the date you received your final benefit payment.

Example: if you received cash benefits until 1 July 2014, you would first meet this requirement on 1 July 2018. However, some benefits do not affect your eligibility for permanent residence.

Read more about the types of benefits that affect your eligibility for permanent residence

Supplementary cash benefits

If your spouse/partner received cash benefits, you may have received supplementary social security during the same period. As a result, you need to be aware of whether he/she received social security at any time in the four years before you submitted your application, or while your application is being processed.

If your spouse/partner received cash benefits, you may have received supplementary social security during the same period. This could result in your application being refused. If you are uncertain whether you have received, or will receive, supplementary cash benefits, contact your municipality.

You need to accept a declaration of residence and self-support.

The declaration is included in the online application and in the printable application form.

The declaration of residence and self-support is also available on the website of the Ministry of Immigration and Integration (site in Danish only)

You need to pass the Danish language test 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2), or a Danish exam of an equivalent or higher level.

List of Danish language tests that are equivalent to or higher than the Danish language test 2:

  • Danish language test 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2) with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale).
  • Passed FVU-reading level 2 or 3.
  • Danish language test 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3) with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale).
  • The study test called studieprøven with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) in each of the tests.
  • 9th or 10th grade final exams with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) in the Danish disciplines, except for conduct.
  • Proof of passed Danish ‘gymnasium’ final exams (STX, HF, HHX, HTX) or a minimum requirement for entrance exam in connection with a vocational program (eux).
  • Proof of passed General Preparatory Examination (almen forberedelsesekamen – avu).
  • Test diploma for passed single subjects in Danish or Danish as a second language with a passed test in at least one Danish discipline/subject area between the levels G-A and with a grade average of at least 6 (on the Danish 13 point grading scale) or 02 (on the Danish 7 point grading scale) from e.g. one of the following educations: stx, hf, hhx, htx, eux, eud or avu.
  • Passed FVU-reading level 4.
  • Proof of passed International Baccalaureate (IB) with Danish on an A or B level.
  • The Danish language test 3 at the study school in Copenhagen.
  • Proof of following a higher educational program at a university, university college (e.g. business school, nursing college or teacher training college) etc., unless the program was not taken in Danish.
     

You may not have worked deliberately against the establishment of your identity in connection with your application for residence permit or extension of your residence permit.

This requirement applies if you have submitted your first time application for residence permit 1 January 2018 or later.

You can for example be considered to have worked against the establishment of your identity, if you have presented falsified identity documents including a passport or a birth certificate, or if you have presented another person’s identity document.

It can also be the case if you have given untrue information about your name, your date of birth, your country of birth or your citizenship, and these conditions later in the processing of the case is being clarified either by you or the immigration authorities through control questions, tests, investigations etc.

If very special reasons apply you can be granted a permanent residence permit even though you have worked against the establishment of your identity.
 

Who can be granted an exemption from the requirements?

Individuals with a disability

To the extent that Denmark’s international obligations, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, require it, the Immigration Service grants exemptions from (that is to say, you will not need to meet) one or more of the requirements for a permanent residence permit.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities defines a person with a disability as someone who has “long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others”.

Exemption from the requirements

If you have a disability that prevents you from meeting one or more of the basic requirements for a permanent residence permit, you will be exempt from meeting these requirements, if the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities dictates it. You can only be granted an exemption from requirements your disability prevents you from meeting.

Regardless of the nature of your disability, you cannot be granted an exemption from the following requirements:

  • You need to have a valid residence permit
  • You need to be over 18
  • You need to have been a legal resident of Denmark for 8 years or more (in certain cases 4)
  • You may not have been convicted of certain types of crimes

When can you apply for a permanent residence permit?

You cannot submit your application for a permanent residence permit until three months before you turn 18 years old.

If you apply for a permanent residence permit before you turn 18, you need to remain in school or employed until you turn 18.

If you apply for a permanent residence permit after you turn 18, but before you turn 19, you need to remain in school or employed until the date you submit your application.

You need to submit your application before your current residence permit expires.

If you do not apply in time

If you submit your application for a permanent residence permit or for an extension of your current residence permit, after your current residence permit expires, the application is submitted to late, and you will be in Denmark illegally. The Immigration Service will likely reject your application, regardless of how briefly you are in Denmark after it expires. The Immigration Service will only process applications that are submitted late if Denmark’s international obligations require it to do so.
If your application is rejected, you will normally need to leave Denmark. If you would like to continue residing in Denmark you will need to apply for a new residence permit. Applications for a new residence permit will be reviewed based on the current rules. You will not be able to apply to have your expired residence permit extended.

If you are staying in Denmark illegally, you risk being reported to the police. You also risk being deported and temporarily banned from entering Denmark or any other EU or Schengen country.
 

The information below explains how to apply for a permanent residence permit. 

We recommend that you make sure you meet the requirements for obtaining a permanent residence permit before paying the application fee. Read more about the requirements in the ‘Need to know’ tab.


 

When submitting an application or appeal with a fee, you must first create a case order ID.

Fee:

DKK 5,030,-

DKK 5,030,-

DKK 5,030,-

DKK 7,035,-

Information about the applicant

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Are you sure you do not want to receive a receipt by mail?

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Are you exempt from paying the fee?

Are you sure a fee is not required to be paid in your case?

Only certain applicants are exempt from paying a fee. If the immigration authorities decide at a later stage that the applicant/appelant is not exempt from paying a fee, the application/appeal will be rejected.
If you have paid a fee and the following case handling shows that the fee should not have been paid, the whole fee will be refunded.

In certain cases the fee is not warranted (fee exemption). Examples are:

  • The Association Agreement between the EU and Turkey
  • Denmark’s international obligations
  • Citizenship of the EU/EEA

You are still required to create a case order ID, even if you are not required to pay a fee.

If you have paid a fee and it is not warranted, the whole fee will be refunded.

Read more about Fee exemption

The information is incorrect

All fees are regulated every year on 1 January. Make sure to create your Case Order ID, pay the fee and submit your application in the same calendar year. If you pay the fee before 1 January and submit your application after 1 January, your application may be rejected.

If no case order ID is shown in the field below, please type your case order ID and click on View payment status.

The information is incorrect The information is incorrect
The information is incorrect

Payment options

You need to enclose documentation with your application, so it is a good idea to gather it all before you start. 

You may need:

Set aside

30 to 40 minutes

to fill in the application form.

1 person

You, the applicant, need to fill in the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose.

The application is only available in Danish.

You need a NemID code card when filling in the application form. Read more about NemID

If you want to resume filling in an application form online select ‘Start online application’. Once you are logged in, select ‘Continue a previously saved application’.

If you would like to make changes to an online application after you have submitted it, you need to contact the Immigration Service. You do not need to submit a new application. Contact the Immigration Service

Start TU1-4 online application

If you are applying for a permanent residence permit as an 18-year old, you are required to use the online version of application form TU1-4, unless you are exempt from this requirement. Read more about mandatory online self-service 

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

When processing your case, we may seek to verify the accuracy of the information you have given. Read more about verification at the Danish Immigration Service

When you submit your application, you will normally need to provide us with your fingerprints and a picture of your face (biometric features) within 14 days. Your biometric features are required in order for you to get a new residence card.

You can have your biometric features recorded at the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service. You must book an appointment before you show up at the Citizen Service. Read more about where the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service has branch offices and how you book an appointment

Read more about residence cards with fingerprints and facial pictures

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