Who can be granted a residence permit?

You can apply for a residence permit if you have strong ties to Denmark based on:

  • former Danish citizenship (indfødsret),
  • Danish descent,
  • membership of the Danish minority in South Schleswig, or
  • affiliation with the Danish minority in Argentina.
     

What are the requirements?

The requirements for a residence permit based on strong ties to Denmark depend on the nature of your ties.  

If you are a former Danish citizen (indfødsret), you can be granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 9 d.

If you have lost your citizenship in accordance with section 8 a or section 8 b of the Danish Citizenship Act (lov om dansk indfødsret), you may not apply for a residence permit as a former Danish citizen.

When applying for a residence permit, you need to provide documentation that you were a Danish citizen, such as a birth certificate (dåbsattest) or your parents’ birth certificates.
 

If you are of Danish descent, you can normally be granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 9 c (1), if you can document that both of your parents (father and mother) or both of your parents’ parents (all four of your grandparents), are or were natural-born Danish citizens (indfødsret). Documentation that you are of Danish descent can be in the form your parents’ or your grandparents’ birth certificates (dåbsattester).

In very special cases, you may also qualify for a residence permit if you can document that one of your parents or one of your parent’s parents (i.e. both of your maternal grandparents or both of your paternal grandparents) are or were natural-born Danish citizens. This rule applies if you have strong ties to Denmark that are comparable with the ties of an individual with two parents who are natural-born Danish citizens, or whose grandparents are all natural-born Danish citizens.

Strong ties of this nature may have been developed through frequent visits to Denmark, or if your Danish parent visited you frequently and you remained in contact by letter, telephone, e-mail or other forms of communication.

You can qualify for a residence permit based on Danish descent even if your parents and grandparents are no longer Danish citizens.
 

If you are a German citizen who is a member of the Danish minority in South Schleswig, you can normally be granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 9 c (1), provided you declare that you consider yourself to be Danish.

Documentation of your membership of the Danish minority can be in the form of: a leaving certificate or letter from a school belonging to the Association of Danish Schools of South Schleswig (Den Danske Skoleforening for Sydslesvig), a membership card or letter from the Southslesvigian Organisation (Sydslesvigsk Forening) or a membership card from the SSW (Sydslesvigsk Vælgerforening).
 

If you are an Argentine citizen who is affiliated with the Danish minority in Argentina, you can normally be granted a residence permit under the terms of Aliens Act section 9 c (1).

Documentation of your affiliation with the Danish minority can be in the form of proof of your membership of a Danish Christian congregation in Argentina.
 

Which type of residence permit will you be granted?

Your initial residence permit will be valid temporarily, typically for a year, with the possibility of extension. Read more about extending your residence permit

If you are granted a residence permit based on strong ties to Denmark, you become eligible for a permanent residence permit after one or two years provided you meet certain requirements. Read more about applying for a permanent residence permit as an individual with strong ties to Denmark

 If you are granted a residence permit in Denmark you will be permitted to work during the period your residence permit is valid.

The information below explains how to apply for a permanent residence permit if you are a former Danish citizen etc. 

You need to complete the application. You also need to enclose documentation, so it is a good idea to gather it all before you start. 

You may need:

Set aside

20 to 25 minutes

to fill in the application form

1 person

You, the applicant, need to fill in the application form

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose.

You can fill in the application form in Word format on your computer before printing it out. The application form is also available as a PDF file that can be printed out and filled in by hand.

Download form SG3 for print

When you submit an application to the Immigration Service, we will process your personal information. You can read more about your rights and how we process your information in the application form or on this page: Personal data – How we process your data

When processing your case, we may seek to verify the accuracy of the information you have given. Read more about verification at the Danish Immigration Service

Applying from outside Denmark

You can submit your application at a Danish mission (embassy or consulate), or an outsourcing office in the country where you live.

See the list of Danish missions or outsourcing offices where you can hand in your application

If there is no Danish mission or outsourcing offices in the country where you live, the list refers to missions Denmark shares a representation agreement with, e.g. Norway or Sweden. If there is no representation agreement, the list refers to the nearest Danish mission or outsourcing office in the region.

The Immigration Service recommends that you visit the website of the Danish mission before you submit your application. Individual offices might have additional requirements, such as extra passport photos or copies of your application.

Applying in Denmark

If you are in Denmark legally, you can normally submit your application in Denmark. This would be the case if you:

  • hold a valid visa
  • are not required to hold a visa, or
  • hold a valid Danish residence permit

You can submit your application to the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service. You must book an appointment before you show up at the Citizen Service. Read more about where the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service has branch offices and how you book an appointment

You can also send your application to the Immigration Service in the post.

Read more about the rules for submitting your application in Denmark

When you submit your application, you will normally need to have your fingerprints recorded and a picture of your face taken. These are also known as your biometric features. Your biometric features are required in order for you to get a new residence card.

Read more about residence cards with fingerprints and facial pictures  

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