The expected maximum processing time is
10 months

The fee is
DKK 2,770,-

Who can be granted a permanent residence permit as an accompanying family member?

What are the requirements if you are a spouse or partner?

What are the requirements if you are a minor child?

Which type of residence permit will you be granted?

Who can be granted a permanent residence permit as an accompanying family member?

As a foreign national, you can qualify for a residence permit if you are:

  • the spouse,
  • cohabiting partner or
  • a minor child

of a foreign national who has been granted a residence permit after retiring from a position in Denmark with an international organisation or the like (referred to as ‘sponsor’ below).

 

What are the requirements if you are a spouse or partner?

As the spouse or cohabiting partner of a retired employee of an international organisation (referred to as ‘sponsor’ below), you need to meet certain requirements in order to qualify for a residence permit. 

Legally valid marriage

If you are married, your marriage needs to be legal under Danish law. In order for your marriage to be declared valid in Denmark, it needs to have been valid in the country where it took place. A marriage can’t be declared valid in Denmark if it violates Danish laws.

This means that:

  • Both you and your spouse need to have been present during the wedding ceremony
  • Neither you nor your spouse can have been represented by someone else during the wedding ceremony
  • You and your spouse need to have been over 18 at the time of the wedding

Permanent cohabitation

The Immigration Service defines ‘permanent cohabitation’ as living together at the same address for a minimum of 18 months. Read more about documenting whether you and your partner have been permanent cohabitants

You cannot be granted an exemption from the requirement about having a legally valid marriage or being cohabiting partners.

 

A marriage or relationship that has the primary goal of qualifying you for a residence permit will be considered a ‘marriage of convenience’. The Immigration Service will look at all aspects of your application to determine whether your marriage/relationship is a marriage of convenience, or whether it qualifies you for a residence permit.

Examples of the things the Immigration Service will look at when evaluating your marriage/relationship are:

  • Whether you have lived together
  • Whether you can communicate in the same language
  • Whether there is a big age difference between you
  • How well you knew each other before getting married or moving in with each other
  • Your previous marriages
  • Whether you have children together
  • Whether the sponsor previously married a foreign national for family reunification, and then divorced the individual shortly after he/she was granted a permanent residence permit.

You cannot be granted an exemption from the requirement that your marriage or relationship is not of convenience.

 

The Immigration Service will not grant you a residence permit if it is doubtful that either you or your spouse/partner entered into your marriage/relationship voluntarily.

The Immigration Service looks at all aspects of your application when assessing this.

If you and your spouse/partner are closely related, the Immigration Service will most likely find that your marriage/relationship is not voluntary.

Examples of the things the Immigration Service will look at when evaluating your marriage/relationship are:

  • The wedding and the contact you had with your spouse before you got married
  • Your age
  • How long you have been married
  • How much contact you had with each other’s families before getting married
  • Your finances, work history, educational history and other personal details
  • Information about any contact that either of you have had with a crisis or counselling centre
  • The Immigration Service may also consider the role your families had in the marriage. But just because your parents or your spouse’s parents were involved in arranging your marriage does not make it a forced marriage.

You cannot be granted an exemption from the requirement that your marriage or relationship must be voluntarily.

 

You need to have a residence permit granted by the Danish Foreign Ministry under the terms of Aliens Act section 47 (1) (ii) as the accompanying family of the sponsor. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.
 

If you are granted a residence permit as an accompanying spouse or partner, you need to live together with the sponsor at the same address in Denmark. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.

 

You need to have DKK 56.482,78 (2019 level) set aside to repay your municipality should it pay you social benefits.

The money can be posted as a demand guarantee (anfordringsgaranti) or placed in an escrow account (deponeringskonto). Read more about the financial guarantee. The procedure for posting collateral is the same as the procedure for posting collateral for a family-reunified spouse.

You cannot be granted an exemption from the requirement about posting collateral.

You need to have passed Prøve i Dansk 1 or another Danish test of an equivalent or higher level. See the full list of test that meet this requirement

You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement. 

What are the requirements if you are a minor child?

As a minor child of a retired employee of an international organisation (referred to as ‘sponsor’ below), you need to meet certain requirements in order to qualify for a residence permit.

 

You need to have a residence permit issued by the Danish Foreign Ministry under the terms of Aliens Act section 47 (1) (ii) as an accompanying family member of the sponsor. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.  

If you are granted a residence permit as an accompanying child, you need to live together with the sponsor at the same address in Denmark. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.

 

The sponsor needs to have partial or full custody over you. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.

 

You may not have started a family of your own. Starting your own family includes cohabiting with a partner or having a child. You cannot be granted an exemption from this requirement.

 

Which type of residence permit will you be granted?

If you are accompanying a spouse or partner, you will be granted a temporary residence permit, valid for 2 years or less. If you still meet the requirements for residency, your residence permit can be extended.

If you are an accompanying child you will be granted a temporary residence permit, typically until you turn 18. If the primary applicant has a temporary residence permit, your residence permit will expire when his/her residence permit expires. Read more about extension of residence permit

When you hold a temporary residence permit as an accompanying family member of someone who has retired from an international organisation, you can apply for permanent residence permit once you have held a temporary residence permit for 8 years, provided you meet certain requirements. In some cases, you can qualify after 4 years. Read more about applying for a permanent residence permit

 

If you are granted a residence permit in Denmark, you do not need a work permit in order to work.

When submitting an application or appeal with a fee, you must first create a case order ID.

Case type:

Retired employee and accompanying family

Fee:

DKK 2,770,-

Information about the applicant

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Are you exempt from paying the fee?

Are you sure a fee is not required to be paid in your case?

Only certain applicants are exempt from paying a fee. If the immigration authorities decide at a later stage that the applicant/appelant is not exempt from paying a fee, the application/appeal will be rejected.
If you have paid a fee and the following case handling shows that the fee should not have been paid, the whole fee will be refunded.

In certain cases the fee is not warranted (fee exemption). Examples are:

  • The Association Agreement between the EU and Turkey
  • Denmark’s international obligations
  • Citizenship of the EU/EEA

You are still required to create a case order ID, even if you are not required to pay a fee.

If you have paid a fee and it is not warranted, the whole fee will be refunded.

Read more about Fee exemption

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All fees are regulated every year on 1 January. Make sure to create your Case Order ID, pay the fee and submit your application in the same calendar year. If you pay the fee before 1 January and submit your application after 1 January, your application may be rejected.

If no case order ID is shown in the field below, please type your case order ID and click on View payment status.

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Payment options

Pay using your Dankort, VISA or MasterCard

Pay by international bank transfer

Case Order ID:

Pay online using your Danish internet bank

Danish internet bank

This page tells you which information is required when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Pay using Danish internet bank

Please include the following information when paying the fee online using a Danish internet bank.

Order payment form and pay fee at a post office or in a bank

Order payment form

On this page you can order a payment form which you can use to pay the fee at a post office or in a bank. 

The payment form will be sent to the address you give below. 

You will need to include various forms of documentation when submitting your application. It is a good idea to gather the documentation before you start.

You may need:

Set aside

20 to 30 minutes

to fill in the application form.

1 person

You, who are applying for a residence permit, need to fill in the application form.

The application form includes detailed instructions for how to fill it in and which types of documentation you need to enclose.

You can read more about how we process your personal data here.

You can fill in the application form in Word format on your computer before printing it out. The application form is also available as a PDF file that can be printed out and filled in by hand.

Download form IP2 for print:

 

Your application can normally only be submitted in Denmark, if you hold a residence permit issued by the Danish Foreign Ministry under the terms of Aliens Act section 47 (1) (ii). For this reason, you normally need to apply before your current residence permit expires.

You can submit your application to the Immigration Service at Citizen Service. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen you can also submit your application at a police station that is capable of recording biometric features.

You can also send your application to the Immigration Service.

Your application can be rejected if it is obvious that you do not meet the requirements.

 

When you submit your application, you will normally need to provide us with your fingerprints and a picture of your face (biometric features) within 14 days. Your biometric features are required in order for you to get a new residence card.

You can have your biometric features recorded at the Immigration Service’s Citizen Service. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen, you can also have your biometric features recorded at certain police stations. See the list of police stations capable of recording biometric features 

Read more about residence cards with fingerprints and facial pictures

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